Environmental assessment of solid waste landfilling technologies by means of lcamodeling (easewaste)
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
By means of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) modelings, this paper aims at providing an evaluation of the environmental performances achieved by six landfilling technologies and at identifying the related environmental benefits and drawbacks.

Impact evaluation of landfills on air quality: odours and toxic compounds
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Emissions from municipal solid waste landfills (MSWL) have the potential to cause olfactive annoyance and health impacts among the surrounding populations. The objective of this study was to examine the impacts on the air quality of MSWL in Quebec in terms of odours and potentially toxics compounds related to biogas emissions.

Landfill gas energy recovery: economic and environmental evaluation for a study case
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
The present study is concerned with the economic and environmental evaluation of landfill gas exploitation system in reference to an existing study case landfill, located in Tuscany Region (Italy).

LEACHING BEHAVIOUR AND CO2 SEQUESTRATION CAPACITY OF ACCELERATED CARBONATED MSWI APC RESIDUES
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Climate change control and sustainable management of natural resources and waste are two of the four priority fields of intervention approved during the U.N. World Summit on sustainable development held in Johannesburg in 2002, which has set the legislative guidelines for European environmental policies until 2012. Concerning the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technologies have been indicated as one of the most viable and effective measures to be applied in the short term, at least until energy production will still rely on fossil fuels combustion (IPCC, 2005). One of the CCS techniques presently investigated mimics natural rock weathering processes by which CO2 is stored as thermodynamically stable carbonates by carbonation of Ca and Mg silicate minerals (wollastonite, serpentine and olivine).

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW PRE-TREATMENT METHOD TO RECOVER RARE METALS IN MSW MELTING FURNACE FLY ASH: LEACHING CHARACTERISTICS OF RARE METAL ELEMENTS
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Melting plants that treat municipal solid waste (MSW) and/or MSW incineration residues at high temperature (approx. 1,400°C) are preferred by many municipalities in Japan due to volume reduction of residues to landfill, decomposition of dioxins, reuse of molten slag, and reduction of hazardous metal leachability. The present number of operating plants is around 140, which corresponds to about 10% of the total incineration facilities (Jung et al., 2006). The primary products in melting plants are molten slag and fly ash, which are generated at about 0.5 million tons and 0.2 million tons per year, respectively.

THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM HYDROXIDE INJECTION ON WASHING PROCESS OF FLY ASH
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Incineration technology is the most widely used technology in Japan to dispose municipal solid waste (MSW). In fiscal year 2004, 77.5 percent of 50.59 million tons of MSW was incinerated (Ministry of the Environment of Japan, 2006). Incineration residue such as fly ash and bottom ash is generated during incineration process.

Ecobalance of Regenerative Thermal Oxidation regarding the avoidance of Greenhouse Gas Emissions
© Wasteconsult international (5/2007)
To assure compliance with valid environmental protection legislation in Germany, it is necessary to treat exhaust air from mechanical-biological treatment plants (MBA) by regenerative-thermal oxidation (RTO).

Anaerobic treatability and methane productivity of meat industry biowastes Premium
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (11/2006)
Four different meat industry biowastes (activated sludge AS, cow manure CM, ruminal waste RW, and pig and cow slurry PCS) were anaerobically digested in batch experiments in order to measure treatability and methane productivity.

Development of Integrated Waste Management Systems in South Africa - Limpopo
© European Compost Network ECN e.V. (9/2006)
SUMMARY: Rio de Janeiro – Kyoto – Johannesburg – Stockholm - Basel – are focusing on the reduction of Greenhhouse gases. As a party to the UNFCCC South Africa has committed itself to report on and to reduce its production of greenhouse gases. In its Polokwane Declaration of 2001, South Africa committed itself to a waste free South Africa by 2022. South Africa has adopted the Waste Hierarchy as the foundation for waste management and is currently completing national legislation with this as a centre piece.

DEKRA Umwelt business areas
© Technical Co-Operation Project Bavaria-Sao Paulo (6/2006)
Lecture in the context of the Technical Co-Operation Sao Paulo - Bavaria. "Solid Waste Management: Facing the Future"

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