A FRAMEWORK TO REDUCE AND MANAGE HAZARDOUS WASTE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Victoria is the second most populous state in Australia and has had a significant manufacturing base since the late 1800s. Managing hazardous waste (locally referred to as prescribed industrial waste) has been a priority for the Victorian Government and the Victorian Environment Protection Authority (EPA) for several years. n 2000, a Victorian Government appointed committee (HWCC, 2000) recommended among other things that: There should be greater emphasis on moving hazardous waste management further up the Waste Hierarchy, to reduce the generation of waste requiring disposal. That existing prescribed waste landfills be phased out and that retrieval repositories and longterm waste containment facilities be developed.Repositories should be designed to take those prescribed wastes for which retrieval possibilities are seen to exist for a higher order use.

LEGISLATIVE, TECHNOLOGICAL, ADMINISTRATIVE AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF "WEEE AND ROHS REGULATIONS"
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
Concern over growing volumes of post-consumer waste and associated environmental and health related problems has prompted significant developments in environmental policies in many countries. Waste from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) is of particular relevance both in developed countries and in several rapidly industrializing developing countries. First, Electrical and Electronic Equipments (EEE) production needs a huge amount of raw materials, whose extraction and transformation represent an important source of environmental damage.

FINANCIAL PROVISION FOR LANDFILLS: A CASE STUDY
© IWWG International Waste Working Group (10/2007)
It is now common practice for regulators to require financial provision to be made for sites or facilities which have the potential to cause environmental harm, such as landfills. The financial provision or financial assurance for a landfill is intended to provide a guarantee that any costs of closure or aftercare do not fall on the public purse in the event that the occupiers or operators of a site become insolvent or do not have the financial capacity to address any liabilities. In some jurisdictions, such as Victoria, Australia, the financial provision is also required to cover clean up costs which may arise from an unexpected event or incident (i.e., remedial action costs).

Separate as you collecte municipal waste
© European Compost Network ECN e.V. (9/2006)
SUMMARY: The population on earth is growing in urban and rural areas. More people generate more waste. More waste needs more installations. New sites are not popular and have to be established at remote areas. This means long transportation distance.

Solid waste management: facing the future
© Technical Co-Operation Project Bavaria-Sao Paulo (9/2005)
The project covers the way for a new extensive waste management scheme for the state and the city of São Paulo. The project aims to change the current procedure on direct landfilling for another that could be considered the state-of-art waste treatment facili-ties, such as waste-to-energy systems, in order to save landfill volume and protecting ground water resources and soil. Thus, the project covers the basics of a mod-ern environmental policy, which follows the principle of long term sustainability. Sustainable consequences of such changes are the protection of natural resources, optimal utilization of waste generated and the minimi-zation of land consumption. In addition, the results of the Johannesburg Summit - where the contribution of a modern waste management to climate protection was mentioned for the first time - must be considered as well.

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