SAFE AND SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN KHULNA CITY OF BANGLADESH

In the rapidly growing cities of developing countries, urban solid waste management is currently been regarded as one of the most immediate and serious issues for city authorities. Due to inadequate and often inefficient solid waste management and visible environmental degredation, solid waste – generated at an increasing rate – has also become an important environmental issue for the residents of the major cities of Least Developed Asian Countries (LDACs) like Bangladesh. In Bangladesh, the urban population have been increasing at a very steep rate, about 6% and is concentrated mostly in six major cities, where nearly 13% of total population and 55 to 60% of total urban population are living. Management of this steeply increasing vast quantities of solid wastes is a very complex process indeed.

This paper presents the outline of a demonstration project that aims to develop a safe and sustainable system for the management of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) in Bangladesh through the practical application of ‘WasteSafe Approach’. Khulna, the third largest city of Bangladesh and situated at the Southwest region of the country, is considered as the case study area. Target groups of this project are local governments, national governmental ministries, professional engineers, academicians, researchers, civic societies, Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs), Community Based Organizations (CBOs), the private sectors and overall the city dwellers who will benefit directly from an improved safe and sustainable MSW management. The main activities are a specific need analysis based on local conditions, the practical application of WasteSafe proposal and its reality check, the development of acceptable composting technology and appropriate landfill construction method through demo projects, studies on the usability of local construction materials and wetlands for engineered landfills, the development of a waste management master plan, the development of technical guidelines for all tiers of waste management, an assessment system and training, seminar and workshops for different target groups regarding to implement an appropriate waste management system as well as technical assistance and backstopping, dissemination and publications.



Copyright: © IWWG International Waste Working Group
Source: Specialized Session C (Oktober 2007)
Pages: 10
Price: € 10,00
Autor: Professor Dr. Muhammed Alamgir
Prof. Dr. Ing. habil. Werner Bidlingmaier
Dr. Ulrich Glawe
Prof. Dr. Chettiyappan Visvanathan
Prof. dr hab. Witold Stepniewski

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