STRATEGIES AND TOOLS TO ESTABLISH AN INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN THE FAST GROWING URBAN CENTER ILOILO CITY, PANAY, PHILIPPINES

Iloilo City is the center of the second largest urban region in the Visayas, an island group forming the central part of the Phillipines, the hub of the newly established Metro Iloilo- Guimaras Economic Development Council (MIGEDC). It is located southeast of Panay Island with a population of 366,000. However, during daytime, the actual population of the city alone reaches half a million, when visitors use or incoming employees work in regional institutions such as universities, hospitals, banks, airport, seaport, and commercial centers which offer special services. Together with its other neighboring MIGEDC municipalities the urban region totals to about 806,549 in population and may become another Mega-Center with a total land area of 988.67 sq.km..

With an active inter-LGU alliance that is committed to the realization of common goals and reinforced with realistic policies and pooled resources (competent human resource and a regular budget), the challenges posed by the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000 (Republic Act 9003) can still be managed by even the poorest LGUs in the Philippines. Through an integrated approach in solid waste management 5th or 4th class municipalities like those in the MIGEDC may still be able comply with the stringent provisions and work targets of RA 9003.



Copyright: © IWWG International Waste Working Group
Source: Specialized Session C (Oktober 2007)
Pages: 2
Price: € 2,00
Autor: Jose Roni Penalosa
N. Hechanova
Bienvenido Lipayon
Dr. Johannes Paul

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